Tag Archives: effects of knowledge

The student of knowledge is known for his eagerness to study and revise with his colleagues

With regards to the causes of the student of knowledge becoming firm in learning and retaining his knowledge of the Sharee’ah, the Noble Scholar Shaykh Muhammad ibn Saalih al ‘Uthaymeen rahimahullaah was asked:

Our esteemed father, what is the correct path that it is obligatory for the student of Sharee’ah knowledge to follow, such that he reaches that which he wishes for from pleasing Allaah, the Perfect and Most High and acquiring knowledge which is beneficial and which will be of use to him and the Muslims?

And what are the factors that will aid the student in memorising and making the issues firmly grounded in his mind and in not forgetting (them)?

Answer:

The most tremendous of the causes is that you have taqwaa (fear of and dutifulness towards) your Lord through obeying Him and leaving off disobeying Him – and your having sincerity towards Him and asking Him for (acceptance of) repentance and for help and for tawfeeq (success in attaining that which is good).

Then being meticulous in (attending) the lessons and in learning, and in preserving your time.

So these are indeed from the most tremendous of the causes.

And from the causes of that also is – studying with your colleagues and striving to (attain) the benefit such that the knowledge becomes established (with you).

So do not just content yourself with your reading and (attending) the lessons with the teacher – rather along with that, there should be studying with your colleagues who are of good character of (those issues) which are not clear to you such that the knowledge becomes established in your mind.

(Quoted in Wasaayaa wa tawjeehaat li tullaab il ilm p37 of Shaykh Muhammad ibn Saalih al ‘Uthaymeen rahimahullaah, translated by Nasser ibn Najam)

Leave a comment

Filed under Action, Fruits of knowledge, How to study, Practical tips on learning

The student of knowledge acts with wisdom and fine manners when dealing with rumours

With regards to the student of knowledge being the foremost to silence rumour mongering in a way that has wisdom and good manners and not being one who spreads rumours, the scholar Muhammad ibn Saalih al ‘Uthaymeen rahimahullaah advised the students:

And I advise you likewise to not squander your time with insulting and reviling, not (doing so) to the rest of the people nor to those in authority from the scholars or leaders.

We say: everyone makes mistakes, no doubt; and no one is rendered free from making mistakes except the one whom Allaah, the Mighty and Majestic, has rendered immune (from that). However should we take errors upon ourselves by way of other people’s mistakes?

No. If someone other than us makes a mistake, we ask Allaah to grant him success in coming to what is correct. This is the most that we can do if we are not able to get to him in order to explain to him that he is upon error.

And therefore I say: always we hear about such-and-such a person that he said such-and-such statement which we hold to be an error and something not correct.

But do we accept this merely on the basis of hearing it, thus building our belief about this man (on that) – the person about whom we have heard that which was said?

The answer: you hear something which you disapprove of about a person, be he a person of knowledge or other than a person of knowledge, a leader or other than a leader. (It may be) something you disapprove in and of itself or it may be something which you disapprove of seeing occurring from this person (in particular). So do you grab hold of what you heard in this way right from the first instant?

The answer: No. So what then is it obligatory for you to do?

The answer: Firstly, before anything else, it is obligatory to verify the authenticity of the report – because it may be that something is reported about a person which he did not (actually) say or do. So it is a must that you verify the report in the first instance.

And I will give you a principle which Shaykh ul Islaam rahimahullaah mentioned in his refutation of the Raafidees in Minaaj us Sunnah: if a statement of a Raafidee was mentioned, he would say firstly in reply to it:

I want to know from you the authenticity of the narration.

And this is something correct because if the report is not authentic then you feel at ease – meaning you have been sufficed.

So when you hear something about someone which it is destested that it should occur from him, then you firstly verify the report.

Then if the matter is established in your view – that the person who has transmitted the report is a trustworthy person and he does not have desires (which he is acting on), then the next stage is binding upon you – and it is is that you verify: Is this statement or this action (actually) something evil?

So as long as this man (who is being criticised) is a person whom you hold to be a person of goodness, and it seems not possible that he would do the evil deed, then it is a must that you verify – is this action an evil?

This is because a person may consider something at first glance to be an evil action, then after reflecting it becomes clear to him that it is not an evil action. So we often hear about so-and-so something which makes our skin shudder and which the souls have an aversion to, but then when we calm down, we find that it is not (actually) an evil action.

Thus it is a must that you ponder – is this an evil action or not?

 

These are the two stages, and they are:

Verification, firstly

Then reflecting and pondering – is this an evil action or not an evil action?

 

The third stage – if you are convinced that it is an evil action, then upon you is to contact the person about whom this report has been transmitted, and you say to him:

O so-and-so, such and such has reached me about you; is it correct?

Because many of our zealous brothers, when he is certain about a statement that it is something evil, then he goes to the one to whom the statement or action was ascribed and says to him:

We have heard such-and-such about you. How can you say that? How can you do that?

We seek refuge with Allaah! Is this from respectful behaviour?

The answer: No! Especially if the one you are addressing is older than you.

So it is obligatory that you go to him and say:

It has reached me about you that such-and-such. Is this correct?

So you know that it is correct but you (still) say to him: Is this correct?

And it may be that he says: Yes, I did say that.

So you say to him: May Allaah give you good. What was (your) approach behind (making) this statement? What was (your) approach behind (doing) this action)? – before you pass a ruling that it is an evil act.

This is because it may be that there is an evidence for it which was hidden from you. Or he is in a situation which necessitates that he does this action, but you did not know.

So this (occurred with) ‘Abdullaah ibn ‘Umar radi Allaahu ‘anhu that he related from the Prophet sall Allaahu ‘alaihi wa sallam as to how a person should sit in his prayer. Then one of his sons saw him sitting cross legged in the prayer, in contradiction to what he had reported from the Messenger, so he said to him:

O my father, how is it that you sit cross legged?

He said to him: Indeed my legs are not able to support me.

Thus does he now have an excuse for going against the Sunnah or not?

The answer: He has an excuse because it may be that for this man to whom the evil action or the objectionable action is ascribed, he has an excuse which leads him to say this statement or do this action.

However this discussion should be with good manners and tactful speech. So then either it becomes clear to you that he is upon the correct position, so you give in – or it does not become clear to you that he is upon the correct position. And with that you have established the proof upon this man and fulfilled your obligation.

And if we were to proceed in our affairs upon this manner, then the affair would be good and the end results praiseworthy. However many of the people are overjoyed to hear something which they use to criticise so-and-so; and they fly off with it to the farthest lands to spread it; and this is a problem which it is obligatory to be on one’s guard against or to distance oneself from.

(Quoted in Wasaayaa wa tawjeehaat li tullaab il ilm p147 of Shaykh Muhammad ibn Saalih al ‘Uthaymeen rahimahullaah, translated by Nasser ibn Najam)

Leave a comment

Filed under Fine manners, Intention, What to avoid

The student of knowledge is the first of the people to act upon his knowledge

With regards to the student of knowledge being the foremost to put his knowledge into practice, the scholar Muhammad ibn Saalih al ‘Uthaymeen rahimahullaah stated:

Upon you – baarak Allaahu feekum – is to act upon what you know because this is the fruit of knowledge.

No, what is the benefit of knowledge which the person does not act upon? There is no benefit in it – rather it will be something harmful for the person.

By Allaah, the ignorant person is better than the person of knowledge who does not act upon his knowledge.

So the proof has been established against the person of knowledge who does not act (upon his knowledge) and the excuse has been cut off for him.

So sometimes the ignorant person learns (something) and (then) acts; but as for the man who is a person of knowledge but he does not act, then his knowledge is a harm for him. Therefore the Prophet sall Allaahu ‘alaihi wa ‘alaa aalihi wa sallam said:

The Qur-aan is a proof for you or against you.[1]

And the Qur-aan is knowledge. So as for the person who memorises the Qur-aan, then is the Qur-aan a proof for him?

The Prophet sall Allaahu ‘alaihi wa sallam divided that into two categories. He said:

… a proof for you or against you.

So it is a proof for you if you act upon it and it is a proof against you if you do not act upon it.

Therefore I urge you to act upon what you have learned such that your knowledge becomes a proof for you, and a means to your attaining the everlasting abode of bliss. I ask Allaah that He makes me and you to be from its people.

Therefore it is a must to act (upon knowledge). And let us strike an example for this.

When a person knows that the prayer is obligatory upon him and that it is obligatory for him to establish them with the congregation in the mosques, then is it befitting for him that he neglects this obligation and that he does not pray except when it is easy for him? When he wakes up from his sleep, (only then) does he pray? When he has a break from work (only then) does he pray?

Is this befitting for him whilst he knows that the prayer in congregation is obligatory for him to be negligent about this?

No, this is absolutely unbefitting for him – and if not, then the ignorant person is better than him.

(Quoted in Wasaayaa wa tawjeehaat li tullaab il ilm p178 to 179, translated by Nasser ibn Najam)

[1]Reported by Muslim (223) from the hadeeth of Aboo Maalik al Ash’aree

Leave a comment

Filed under Action, Fruits of knowledge

The student of knowledge does not bring about ta’assub and thereby cause Muslims to split away from each other

The Noble Shaykh, Muhammad ibn Saalih al ‘Uthaymeen rahimahullaah said:

Then there has indeed occurred tafarruq (splitting) and differing in opinions and ideas amongst the youth in our towns and in other than them. And ta’assub (bigoted adherence), be that to the statements or to the people who spoke (those statements).

So barakah (blessing) has been taken away from their actions.

And– instead of being one nation – they have become separated and ones who fight amongst themselves, up to the extent that the person who was your brother yesterday is your enemy today, due to ta’assub.

Therefore it is obligatory upon us to be aware of this bottomless pit and that the person strives in that which will benefit him and leave off that which contains no goodness. The Prophet sall Allaahu ‘alaihi wa sallam said:

The one who truly believes in Allaah and in the Last Day, let him speak good – or remain silent.”[1]

And He, the Most High, said in description of the servants of ar Rahmaan (the Most Merciful):

<<And when they pass by some evil play or evil talk, they pass by it with dignity.>>[2]

(Soorah al Furqaan (25) aayah 72)

Meaning – they do not waste their time in it; rather they work hard to preserve their time in that which will benefit them in their present and in their future.

Quoted in Wasaayaa wa tawjeehaat li tullaab il ‘ilm page 83-4 , translated by Nasser ibn Najam


[1] Reported by al Bukhaari (6018, 6136, 6138) and Muslim from the hadeeth of Aboo Hurayrah radi Allaahu ‘anhu

[2] Soorah al Furqaan (25) aayah 72

Leave a comment

Filed under Fine manners, The Etiquette of Seeking Knowledge, What to avoid

The student of knowledge feels no envy of people who are learning and he does everything he can to help them, not hinder them

With regards to the student of knowledge being pleased with and helping the Muslim who is learning and not having any envy of him, the Shaykh Muhammad ibn Saalih al ‘Uthaymeen rahimahullaah comments:

And from that which is befitting for the student of knowledge with regards to his colleagues is that he does not have jealousy of them regarding that which Allaah has bestowed upon them, by way of memorization or understanding or knowledge.

And that he does not have jealousy of them in that by which he may benefit them, by way of supporting (them) and helping (them) – be that in (giving them) a booklet or (sharing) research or other than that.

This is because for some of the students, Shaytaan speaks to him saying to him, “If you help your companion, he will become better than you.” And this is an error.

Rather we say, just as the Prophet sall Allaahu ‘alaihi wa ‘alaa aalihi wa sallam said:

Allaah is in the aid of the servant whilst the servant is in the aid of his brother.”

And it does not automatically follow on that if your companion is someone who is coming for the forefront (due to his knowledge) or someone who is attaining knowledge which he did not attain except with your (help), it is does not necessitate that he has got ahead of you.

So (by helping him) you are benefitting yourself and you are not harming your own self at all.

Quoted in Wasaayaa wa tawjeehaat li tullaab il ‘ilm page 82, translated by Nasser ibn Najam

Leave a comment

Filed under Fine manners, Fruits of knowledge, What to avoid

The student of knowledge acts on his knowledge

With regards to the student of knowledge having the least excuse for not acting upon his knowledge, Shaykh Muhammad ibn Saalih al ‘Uthaymeen rahimahullaah comments :

So what is the fruit of knowledge?

The fruit of knowledge is: acting upon it and calling to it.

Therefore the obligation to act upon knowledge for the student of knowledge is greater than what is obligatory on other than him – because the ignorant person is not an imaam (leader). So he is not taken as a role model, not in his action nor in his statements.

However the student of knowledge is taken as a role model. Therefore, upon the student of knowledge is to act on his knowledge because the student of knowledge carries his weapon – either it will be against him or it will be for him, just as the Prophet sall Allaahu ‘alaihi wa sallam said:

The Qur-aan is a proof for you or against you. [1]

And there is no third category here, such that the Qur-aan would be neither for you nor against you. It is either for you or against you, so when will it be for you?

The answer: It will be for you if you act upon it, and if you are a righteous role model in directing the creation towards goodness.

And it will be against you if you neglect it and turn away from it and relinquish it.

Therefore it is obligatory upon us to act upon knowledge and that we be righteous role models and that we be imaams for our Islamic nations in whichever place (we are in) – because if a person acts upon what he knows, he becomes an imaam; Allaah, the Most High, will bequeath to him knowledge which he did not know of before.

Pay attention to this point: if you act upon what you know you will become an imaam and the people will copy you and you will become a role model, then Allaah, the Most High, will increase you in knowledge and he will bequeath to you knowledge of a matter which you did not know beforehand.

And read the statement of Allaah, the Most High:

And as for those who accept guidance, then He increases them in guidance…[2]

Meaning: in knowledge.

…and He bestows upon them their taqwaa (fear and dutifulness to Him).[3]

Meaning: action.

Upon you is action on knowledge.

If you know that Allaah has made obligatory such-and-such upon you, then hasten to (do) it. You know that Allaah has made such-and-such forbidden for you, then distance yourself from it.

And if not, then you have missed out on the fruit of knowledge, you have completely missed out on it.

Therefore the fruit of knowledge and the intent behind it is acting (upon it).

Quoted in Wasaayaa wa tawjeehaat li tullaab il ‘ilm pages 258 to 260, translated by Nasser ibn Najam


[1] Reported by Muslim (223) from the hadeeth of Abu Maalik al Ash’aree

[2] Soorah Muhammad (47) aayah 17

[3] Soorah Muhammad (47) aayah 17

Leave a comment

Filed under Action, The Etiquette of Seeking Knowledge

The student of knowledge is the furthest from chasing after money

With regards to the student of knowledge knowing the true status of money, Shaykh Muhammad ibn Saalih al ‘Uthaymeen rahimahullaah comments:

Then indeed I say to you – if you were to say to your brother asSalaamu alaikum how much (reward) would you attain? Ten good deeds – along with friendship and love and affection and an opening up of the chest and a smile on the face.

What is your opinion about if it were said to one of you, “If you give salaam to your brother, we will give you one dirham?” Would you give the salaam?

The answer: yes, you would give the salaam and maybe you would pause a little while in order to give salaam a second time – for the sake of (another) one dirham. Yet what is its (the money’s) end destination?

Indeed its end destination is the toilet – for the greatest pleasure which the person takes delight in is food and drink. And what is the end destination of the food and drink? The toilet.

Therefore Shaykh ul Islaam ibn Taymiyyah rahimahullaah said:

It is befitting for the person who has intellect that he deems wealth to have the station of a donkey which he rides on or the station of the toilet in which he answers his call of nature.

And this is the position (adopted) by those who have awareness and knowledge.

Quoted in Wasaayaa wa tawjeehaat li tullaab il ‘ilm pages 183 to 184, translated by Nasser ibn Najam

Leave a comment

Filed under Fine manners, Fruits of knowledge

The student of knowledge is known for his fine and honourable behaviour

With regards to the student of knowledge adorning himself with muroo-ah (honourable and fine behaviour), Shaykh Muhammad ibn Saalih al ‘Uthaymeen rahimahullaah comments:
And what is muroo-ah?
The scholars of fiqh – may Allaah have mercy upon them – have established what it is in the Book of shahaadaat (bearing witness).
They said:  it is doing that which beautifies him and adorns him and avoiding of that which would dishonour him and disgrace him.
And this is an expression which is general (in its nature) – everything which will beautify you in the eyes of the people, and adorn you and which will be a cause for your being praised, then this is muroo-ah, even if it is not from the acts of worship.
And everything which is opposite (to this), then it is something that opposes muroo-ah.
Then (the author) strikes an example for this, by saying that (from muroo-ah) is having noble manners. So what are noble manners? They are that the person is always forbearing, that he is forbearing when it is the occasion for forbearance; and that he acts with firm resolve when it is the occasion for firm resolve.
And therefore the Islaamic Religion has come being justly balanced between forbearance – by which rights may be lost – and acting with firm resolve, which may sometimes lead to oppression.
(Sharh hilyah taalib il ‘ilm p36 of Shaykh Muhammad ibn Saalih al ‘Uthaymeen rahimahullaah, translated by Nasser ibn Najam)

Leave a comment

Filed under Fine manners, Fruits of knowledge

The student of knowledge is known for being cheerful and plentiful in smiling

The noble scholar, Shaykh Muhammad ibn Saalih al ‘Uthaymeen rahimahullaah stated:

And it is befitting for the student of knowledge that he be a person of beautiful manners and temperament, constantly (a person) of happiness, constantly (a person) of relaxedness – because (this) was from the characteristics of the Prophet sall Allaahu ‘alaihi wa sallam which Allaah created to be in his natural disposition and with which He blessed him.

And He said about him:

And indeed you (Muhammad) are of exalted manners, the manners of the Qur-aan.[1]

Soorah al Qalam (68) aayah 4

From his characteristics was that he was constantly (a person) of joy, plentiful in smiling – may Allaah’s salaat and salaam be upon him.

And there is no doubt that if a person is always joyful and plentiful in smiling then the person who meets him will feel happiness from (meeting) him.

But if you were to meet a man, frowning and gloomy, would you be happy due to meeting him? No. Therefore my brother, be always happy, plentiful in smiling, with a bright and cheerful face.

And therefore from the characteristics of Eemaan is that you meet your brother with a cheerful face. And know with the knowledge of certainty that if you possess this characteristic, you will be a person who is calm and relaxed, (both when) standing or sitting, in your house and in the market. And be constantly happy with your brothers, with a cheerful face and plentiful in smiling.

(Quoted in Wasaayaa wa tawjeehaat li tullaab il ilm p49 of Shaykh Muhammad ibn Saalih al ‘Uthaymeen rahimahullaah, translated by Nasser ibn Najam)


[1] Refer to Tafseer at Tabaree

Leave a comment

Filed under Fine manners, Fruits of knowledge, The Etiquette of Seeking Knowledge